PreventX: Messaging for a Movement tips and insights for messaging and advocacy

PreventX: Messaging for a Movement

Tips and insights for messaging and advocacy to address the drivers of family and gender-based violence

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This resource aims to share tips and insights that were gathered as part of the PreventX: Messaging for a Movement conference, held 19 –20 March 2024.

The PreventX conference in 2024 brought a fresh focus on how to craft and deliver messages that shift hearts and minds to deliver long-term and sustainable social change to prevent family and gender-based violence. Drawing from extensive experience in messaging, effective campaigns, grassroots mobilising and advocacy, PreventX showcased and helped to build knowledge about messages that resonate and effect change.

This tip sheet summarises the key learnings from PreventX around messaging to advance primary prevention right now.

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Resource type: Tip sheets
Download file type: 11-page PDF
Best print size: A4 

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Communicating for Connection: Values-based messaging for primary prevention in multicultural and faith-based communities

Communicating for Connection

Values-based messaging for primary prevention in multicultural and faith-based communities

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This resource brings together lessons from members of the Connecting Communities network and existing evidence on how to use a values-based, community-led approach to developing messaging around primary prevention in multicultural and faith-based settings.

Building community engagement and support through tailored, strengths-based messaging is an essential part of any primary prevention project. When working in multicultural and faith-based settings, ensuring that the community’s experiences and desires are embedded into your messaging is key to creating cultural safety and effective programs. 

This resource draws on the existing evidence base, as well as practice examples from members of the Connecting Communities network, to outline how a values-based messaging approach can be applied with multicultural and faith-communities to strengthen your prevention messaging. It aims to highlight the role of values-based messaging as a tool to engage community, build trust and address backlash and resistance by creating messages that resonate with communities. 

This resource has been developed as part of the Connecting Communities program, a partnership program between the Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health (MCWH) and Safe and Equal to support the learning and professional development needs of the Connecting Communities network, a network of organisations working with multicultural and faith-based communities to prevent violence against women in Victoria since 2022. 

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Resource type: Practice guide 
Download file type: 16-page PDF
Best print size: A4 

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Improving our approach to community-led prevention: Lessons from the Connecting Communities program

Improving our approach to community-led prevention

Lessons from the Connecting Communities program

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This resource brings together lessons from members of the Connecting Communities network and existing evidence on how to embed community-led practices into primary prevention initiatives working with multicultural and faith-based communities.  

Primary prevention activities in multicultural and faith-based communities are exciting opportunities for practitioners to take a community-led approach to program development and implementation. Community-led prevention can help practitioners put intersectional theory into practice by centring community expertise and needs, resulting in prevention programs that are culturally relevant, effective and sustainable.

This brief guide has been designed to support prevention practitioners working in community-led prevention initiatives with multicultural and faith-based communities. It also aims to share practical lessons from the Connecting Communities network which can be embedded into any primary prevention initiatives that engage with these communities.

This resource has been developed as part of the Connecting Communities program, a partnership program between the Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health (MCWH) and Safe and Equal to support the learning and professional development needs of the Connecting Communities network, a network of organisations working with multicultural and faith-based communities to prevent violence against women in Victoria since 2022. 

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Resource type: Brief guide 
Download file type: 4-page PDF and Word Doc
Best print size: A4 

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Key Messages Guidance – Supporting Young People to Understand Affirmative Consent Program

Key Messages Guidance

Supporting Young People to Understand Affirmative Consent Program

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This ‘Key Messages Guide’ explores the key definitions, legislative changes and key messages around affirmative consent in the Victorian legal context.

This information sheet has been prepared by the Affirmative Consent Leadership Consortium (SAS Vic, in collaboration with YAC Vic, Safe and Equal and Victorian Legal Aid) to support and guide project partners of the Supporting Young People to Understand Affirmative Consent Program, funded by the Department of Families, Fairness and Housing (DFFH).

This Key Messages Guide is intended to be used by organisations educating and supporting young people to understand affirmative consent in the Victorian legal context. The guide has been informed by the Justice Legislation Amendment (Sexual Offences and Other Matters) Act 2022 that came into effect in Victoria on 30 July 2023.

This guide covers:

  • How to use this document to develop key messages
  • What are the new affirmative consent laws?
  • Definitions
  • Guidance for key message and resource development:
    • Affirmative consent
    • Circumstances where there is no consent
    • Reasonable belief
    • Image-based abuse
  • How to access support in Victoria

Disclaimer: This document is intended as general overview only. The contents do not constitute legal advice, are not intended to be a substitute for legal advice and should not be relied upon as such.

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Resource type: Key messaging guide

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Safe and Equal Disability Inclusion Forum 2023

Safe and Equal Disability Inclusion Forum 2023

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On Wednesday 15 November 2023, Safe and Equal hosted the annual Disability Inclusion Forum to support practitioners in enhancing their practice when working with victim survivors with disability.

The forum provided a platform for practitioners to learn from key professionals in the field, who shared their knowledge and practice insights. In alignment with Safe and Equal’s Code of Practice, the forum aimed to increase practitioners’ capacity to promote a safe, inclusive, and equitable service system response to victim survivors with disability.

The forum was divided into two webinars:

  1.  Barriers to service access for victim survivors with disability
  2. Supporting victim survivors with psychosocial disability

Webinar 1: Barriers to service access for victim survivors with disability

Webinar 2: Supporting victim survivors with psychosocial disability

Download

Webinar 1: Barriers to service access for victim survivors with disability

Natasha (Safe Steps Family Violence Response Centre)

Webinar 2: Supporting victim survivors with psychosocial disability

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Resource type: Video

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Statewide Prevention Workforce Development Program Theory of Change

Statewide Prevention Workforce Development Program

Theory of Change

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This document sets out the Theory of Change for the Statewide Prevention Workforce Development.

This document shows the long-term vision for the Statewide Prevention Workforce Development Program through to 2026 and beyond. The Theory of Change, including organisational and sectoral assumptions, evidence and enablers for this work. The document is shared for sector visibility of this key Safe and Equal program, and useful for understanding annual program evaluations. 

The program is delivered by Safe and Equal with funding from the Victorian Department of Families Fairness and Housing (2022-26) and Department of Education (2021-25). 

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Resource type: Report
Download file type: 4-page PDF
Best print size: A4

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Statewide Prevention Workforce Development Program Summary Evaluation Report 22/23

Statewide Prevention Workforce Development Program

Summary Evaluation Report 22/23

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This report is a summary of evaluation of the Statewide Prevention Workforce Development program in 2022/23.

This report is a summary of evaluation of the Statewide Prevention Workforce Development program in 2022/23.  

Evaluation demonstrates that the Statewide program remained highly successful in reaching and building the capability and connection of primary prevention practitioners across Victoria during 2022/23. Performance on all key indicators was well above target, and results relating to relevance and effectiveness exceeded last year’s performance. The inter-connected and complementary nature of activities facilitated peer and sector connection, with feedback from practitioners suggesting they see benefits for their wellbeing, learning and confidence. 

2022/23 was Year 2 for the Statewide Prevention Workforce Development Program (known as ‘the Statewide program’), delivered by Safe and Equal with funding from the Victorian Department of Families Fairness and Housing (2022-26) and Department of Education (2021-25). 

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Resource type: Report
Download file type: 11-page PDF
Best print size: A4

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Overcoming Resistance and Backlash – a Guide for Primary Prevention Practitioners

Overcoming Resistance and Backlash

A Guide for Primary Prevention Practitioners 

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This resource brings together and adds to existing resources by providing tips on effective strategies and ways of overcoming resistance, and other more extreme forms of backlash.

Anyone working to prevent or respond to family and gender-based violence through social change will experience resistance. This resource brings together and adds to existing work in supporting practitioners to understand and respond to resistance and backlash.

Working together and sharing lessons is essential in doing this effectively, and maintaining practitioner wellbeing.

This resource is informed by a panel discussion at the Safe and Equal Members’ Forum on responding to backlash and resistance across the continuum, held in July, 2023. Access more resources and information about our resistance training here. 

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Resource type: Guide
Download file type: 12-page PDF
Best print size: A4

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Driving Change

Driving Change

Taking action against the drivers of
family and gender-based violence

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Taking action against the drivers of family and gender-based violence has to be based on understanding the social conditions that predict and drive this violence.

‘Driving Change’ supersedes DVRCV’s ‘Unpacking the Gendered Drivers of Violence Against Women’ tip sheet series.

When working to prevent family and gender-based violence, we need to understand the most important social conditions that predict and drive this violence. Addressing these upstream ‘drivers’ is the foundation for primary prevention. Change the Story, outlines the four key drivers of men’s violence against women, but the challenge for practitioners is how to work against the drivers without re-stating them over and over in ways that make the current situation seem inevitable.

Our newest resource flips the drivers to focus on the change we want to see, with a focus on practical and positive actions that everyone can take to end family and gender-based violence.

We all deserve a world where we can live and love freely and fully, where families and relationships are safe and respectful, and people have everything they need to thrive. This resource helps us get there.

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Resource type: Infographic
Download file type: 8-page PDF
Best print size: A4

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Resistance and backlash across the continuum

Resistance and backlash across the continuum

Safe and Equal Annual Member Forum 2023

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This interactive panel discussion, recorded during the Safe and Equal Annual Member Forum 2023, explores how resistance is experienced across the continuum from prevention to response.

Resistance and backlash across the continuum is a video of an interactive panel discussion exploring how resistance is experienced across the continuum from prevention to response. The session was held during the Safe and Equal Member Forum 2023.

The session provides an overview on drivers of family and gender-based violence, and forms of resistance, before moving into a panel discussion about experiences of resistance across a range of spaces and the tools and strategies used to address and manage that resistance.

Speakers include:

  • Belinda O Connor, Rainbow Health Australia
  • Linden Deathe, Sexual Assault and Family Violence Centre
  • Dr. Adele Murdolo, Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health
  • Michael Hail, Jesuit Social Services – The Men’s Project
  • Dale Wakefield, GenWest

Resources:

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Resource type: Video

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Fast Facts on Family and Gender-based Violence 2023

Fast Facts on Family and Gender-based Violence 2023

A guide for prevention practitioners

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Fast Facts provides an overview of statistics and key facts related to experiences and impacts of family and gender-based violence, and changing social attitudes towards these.

Statistics can be a powerful way to convince people about a social problem and provide an impetus for change. Though statistics only tell part of the story.

Fast Facts provides statistics and key facts about how many people experience family and gender-based violence, its impacts, and how attitudes towards violence are changing.

In line with the principles of values-based messaging, this revised resource places statistics and key facts within a narrative that articulates a positive and hopeful vision for the future, and outlines actions that people and communities can take to help realise this vision and collectively contribute to a safer and better future for all.

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Resource type: Infographic
Download file type: 8-page PDF
Best print size: A4

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Affirmative Consent and Primary Prevention Practice Webinar

Affirmative Consent and Primary Prevention Practice Webinar

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What is affirmative consent and how does it complement existing prevention programs? What work is being done to support young people, their communities and organisations to understand this change in legislation, and have broader conversations about sex, consent and relationships?

This online webinar, hosted by Safe and Equal in collaboration with SAS Vic and YAC Vic, will examine these critical questions.

Affirmative Consent becomes law in Victoria in July 2023. These changes in legislation will not only strengthen responses to family and sexual violence, but also the way organisations work to prevent these forms of violence.

Join us as Dr Amy Webster (Sexual Assault Services Victoria) briefly introduces affirmative consent. Afterwards Anita North (Victorian Aboriginal Child Care Agency), Rhiannon (Centre Against Sexual Assault Central Victoria), Genevieve Sheppard (Our Watch) and Samantha Reed (Sexual Health Victoria) will join a panel discussion and explore what the legislative changes mean for their respective areas of work, and the implications for new and existing prevention programs.

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Resource type: Video

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In Conversation: The State of Play in Workforce Development Webinar

In Conversation: The State of Play in Workforce Development Webinar

 Explore the state of play for the primary prevention workforce in Victoria and nationally

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What do we mean when we say, prevention ‘workforce development’? Who is exactly is this workforce? What is the current state for those delivering primary prevention of family and gendered violence?

This webinar explores the state of play for the primary prevention workforce, in Victoria and nationally, examining who it includes, the breadth and scope of activity being undertaken, and what’s needed to further develop and strengthen the workforce to meet its broader goals.

As we step into a new phase for prevention efforts under a new National Action Plan, and amidst announcements that all recommendations from the Royal Commission in Victoria have been implemented, it is timely to stop and reflect on what has been achieved and what is left to be done to ensure continued support for this evolving workforce. A diverse panel of speakers from across sectors and settings will debate and explore key trends and challenges, critical needs in building the capability of the workforce as well as what is needed to ensure sustainability for the primary prevention workforce.

This webinar will include a panel discussion, featuring prevention practitioners across a variety of different settings, talking about their experiences in workforce development, and sharing their expertise on what is needed in this space.

The event will be moderated by Amelia Ditcham, Prevention Practice and Workforce Development Manager at Safe and Equal, with opening remarks by Marina Carman, Executive Director Primary Prevention at Safe and Equal.

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Resource type: Video

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Intersectionality in Primary Prevention

Intersectionality in Primary Prevention

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‘Intersectionality in primary prevention’ builds on Safe and Equal’s commitment to intersectionality and aims to draw on existing knowledge and experience in applying an intersectional analysis and approach to the prevention of family and gender-based violence. 

Safe and Equal’s commitment to intersectionality is a guiding principle of our work as an organisation. 

An intersectional approach means we, as an organisation, take action to ensure primary prevention programs, systems and policies recognise and address multiple forms of oppression and disadvantage that exacerbate the experiences of gender inequality and gender-based violence. 

We acknowledge the work of many other organisations and individuals in defining and leading this work. This is not intended as a definitive guide, but as one contribution to the development of future thinking and approaches in this area – by outlining our own organisational commitment to intersectionality in primary prevention of family and gendered violence. 

Acknowledging existing work
The following resources provide a detailed analysis of the drivers of violence for particular communities. We acknowledge the individual and collective leadership that these resources have provided in deepening intersectional knowledge and approaches in primary prevention in Australia.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities
+ Changing the Picture, Our Watch

Women with disabilities
+ Changing the Landscape, Our Watch
+ Intersectionality and primary prevention of violence against women,
Women with Disabilities Victoria

Immigrant and refugee women
+ Intersectionality Matters,
Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health

LGBTIQ+ communities
+ Pride in Prevention: Evidence Guide,
Rainbow Health Australia
+ Pride in Prevention: Partnership Guide,
Rainbow Health Australia

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Resource type: Guide
Download file type: 6-page PDF
Best print size: A4

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How to Use Statistics in Primary Prevention

How to Use Statistics in Primary Prevention

Understanding their importance, uses and limitations

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‘How to Use Statistics in Primary Prevention’ aims to support a greater understanding of the importance, uses and limitations of statistics within the context of primary prevention and family violence.  

Statistics can be a powerful way to convince people about a social problem, and particularly to argue for the prioritisation of government policy and investment.  

Numbers that quantify how many people experience family and gender-based violence are critical for gaining attention and arguing the need for change. Meanwhile, numbers that tell us about attitudes towards violence are important in tracking progress in changing attitudes that drive violence and helping us prevent it in the future. 

But statistics only tell part of the story. This resource aims to support a greater understanding of statistics within the context of the primary prevention continuum, how best to use them, and their limitations. 

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Resource type: Guide
Download file type: 6-page PDF
Best print size: A4

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What is Primary Prevention? Connecting across the continuum from prevention to response

What is Primary Prevention?

Connecting across the continuum from prevention to response

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‘What is Primary Prevention?’ aims to promote understanding of work across the continuum from prevention to response, as well as provide practical suggestions to improve connection. 

Ending family and gender-based violence is long-term work that must occur at all levels and all settings.   

A key feature of policies and frameworks looking at family and gendered violence at both state and national level is an understanding of a continuum of work required across primary prevention, early intervention, response and recovery is  

across the community. This includes the national framework for prevention of violence against women, Change the Story, and the Victorian strategy for preventing family violence and all forms of violence against women, Free from Violence. It is also a feature of the National Plan to End Violence against Women and Children.  

Addressing the needs of victim-survivors and ultimately ending family and gender-based violence will require specialised and complementary activities undertaken by a range of practitioners, programs and organisations, across the continuum. 

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Resource type: Tip sheets
Download file type: 7-page PDF
Best print size: A4

How We Thrive Video Series

'How We Thrive' Video Series

Supporting wellbeing and excellence among primary prevention practitioners

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The ’How We Thrive’ resource suite contains four videos, each with a supporting tip sheet, that help managers and organisational leaders understand what prevention practitioners need to feel supported and valued in their organisations, as well as helping prevention practitioners to advocate for their own projects and wellbeing. 

We launched this resource series on Wednesday 22 February 2023, with the support of an expert panel from non-specialised organisations. You can watch the webinar recording below.

What do primary prevention practitioners need from managers?

What is wellbeing and self care in primary prevention?

Advocacy in the primary prevention sector

Flourish in the primary prevention sector

‘How We Thrive’ Resource Launch Webinar

Victorian primary prevention practitioners work across many settings, some which are specialised in family violence and prevention, and others which undertake broader work. Practitioners in non-specialised settings may work in isolation, and therefore require particular support from their managers and organisational leaders. 

The ’How We Thrive’ resource suite contains four videos, each with a supporting tip sheet, that help managers and organisational leaders understand what prevention practitioners need to feel supported and valued in their organisations. ‘How We Thrive’ helps prevention practitioners to advocate for their own projects and wellbeing within their organisations. 

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Resource type: Video
Download file type: MP4
Captions: English

Looking Back, Moving Forward

Looking Back, Moving Forward

Learnings from the transition to working online in primary prevention

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Looking Back, Moving Forward reflects upon the prevention sector’s transition to online working during COVID-19, and supports practitioners to embed these learnings into future work. 

Looking Back, Moving Forward reflects upon the primary prevention sector’s transition to remote and online working during the COVID-19 pandemic and multiple lockdowns in Victoria. The resource strikes an important balance between recognising and making space for the struggles faced by practitioners and celebrating the sector’s wins and ingenuity in the face of the pandemic and its impacts.  

The resource draws directly from the experiences of practitioners themselves (gained focus group interviews) as well as pre-existing reports such as Respect Victoria’s Impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on Victoria’s family violence primary prevention workforce. 

The resource will also serve as a call to action for practitioners to continue embedding the learnings from the last two years to ensure accessibility, inclusion and safety for all primary prevention practitioners. 

Prevention workers’ journeys from face-to-face, to remote and now hybrid working has been both difficult and fruitful, with everyone experiencing this transition in different ways and for different reasons. This resource aims to support prevention workers in the process of looking back and moving forward by highlighting learnings and techniques that can inform ongoing prevention practice in an online context. 

Looking Back Moving Forward draws on the voices of Victorian prevention workers to tell these stories. While the views and experiences outlined in this resource cannot capture all the learnings of the last few years, there are common themes that can support workers now and into the future. Input was gathered through interviews and reflective focus groups led by Safe and Equal, as well as Respect Victoria and the Gender and Disaster Pod’s Impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on Victoria’s family violence primary prevention workforce. 

This resource is for Victorian prevention workers and assumes an understanding of the Victorian primary prevention of family and gendered violence sector. While this is the primary audience for this resource, many of the key learnings would be valuable those working in other sectors as well. 

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Resource type: Booklet
Download file type: 12-page PDF
Best print size: A4

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Achieving Generational Change Conference 2018 – On the ground with respectful relationships

Achieving Generational Change Conference 2018

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On 29 May 2018, more than 200 primary prevention of violence against women and respectful relationships education practitioners gathered for DVRCV’s first prevention conference. The one-day event examined Victoria’s journey towards embedding and mainstreaming respectful relationships in the education system.

This is a recording of a panel session at the 2018 Achieving Generational Change conference, ‘On the ground with respectful relationships.’ This panel was moderated by Krista Seddon – Director, Prevention of Violence Against Women, DVRCV, alongside panellists including:

  • Jan Tracey – Health Promotion Training Coordinator, Gippsland Women’s Health
  • Jeremy Ludowyke – School Principal, Melbourne High School
  • Ash Pike – Respectful Relationships Project Lead, Department of Education and Training
  • Cara Gleeson – Manager, Children and Young People, Our Watch
  • Alison MacDonald – Policy and Program Manager, Domestic Violence Victoria

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Resource type: Video
Watch video: YouTube Link

Unpacking the Gendered Drivers of Violence Against Women tip sheet series

Unpacking the Gendered Drivers of Violence Against Women tip sheet series

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These tip sheets have been designed to convey the complexity of what drives violence against women in an easy-to-understand resource.

This series is a great accompaniment for primary prevention practitioners to use in any setting.

The evidence base from Change the Story tells us that gender inequality creates the social conditions for violence against women to occur. There are four key expressions of gender inequality that have been found to predict or drive this violence.
  1. Condoning of violence against women
  2. Men’s control of decision-making and limits to women’s independence in public and private life
  3. Rigid gender stereotyping and dominant forms of masculinity
  4. Male peer relations and cultures of masculinity that emphasise aggression, dominance and control
To prevent violence against women, we must focus our efforts on addressing these drivers.

This tip sheet series provides:

  • an understanding of each gendered driver
  • examples of what each gendered driver can look like within different settings where people live, learn, work, socialise and play
  • an understanding of actions that will help prevent violence against women.

Ideas on how you can use this resource

  • Print and display the posters in your workplace – to request the print version of this resource, please email our Communications team.
  • Use this resource to start conversations with colleagues and community groups about the drivers of violence against women.
  • Share the tip sheets in your organisation’s newsletter.
  • Use this resource in a range of activities when delivering prevention of violence against women training.

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Resource type: Tipsheet
Download file type: 2 page PDF
Best print size: A4

Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Responding to Disclosures in Prevention Settings (2 of 2)

Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Responding to Disclosures in Prevention Settings (2 of 2)

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We know that primary prevention activities often increase the likelihood of people disclosing. These disclosures may be about their personal experience of violence, perpetration of violence or their family situation. It is important that prevention practitioners have the skills and understanding to respond effectively in these situations. This video is part of a series on Respectful Relationships in Victoria.

Join the conversation with a panel of experts, educators and practitioners who will discuss key considerations and suggest practical techniques to safely respond to a disclosure from a colleague or a child/young person.

Featuring panellists:

  • Deanne Carson, CEO & Co-founder, Body Safety Australia
  • Alyssha Fooks, Program Leader, Education Training and Development, CASA House
  • Sangwon Lee, PVAW Project Officer, Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health
  • Deborah Robins, Foundation Teacher, Brunswick North West Primary School
  • Genevieve Sheppard, Senior Education Advisor, Our Watch

Moderated by Maria Delaney, PVAW Specialist, Capability Building, DVRCV

This video is part two of two. View the first part: Responding to Disclosures in Prevention Settings (1 of 2)

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Resource type: Video
Duration: 1:34:01

Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Responding to Disclosures in Prevention Settings (1 of 2)

Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Responding to Disclosures in Prevention Settings (1 of 2)

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We know that primary prevention activities often increase the likelihood of people disclosing. These disclosures may be about their personal experience of violence, perpetration of violence or their family situation. It is important that prevention practitioners have the skills and understanding to respond effectively in these situations. This video is part of a series on Respectful Relationships in Victoria.

Join the conversation with a panel of experts, educators and practitioners who will discuss key considerations and suggest practical techniques to safely respond to a disclosure from a colleague or a child/young person.

Featuring panellists:

  • Deanne Carson, CEO & Co-founder, Body Safety Australia
  • Alyssha Fooks, Program Leader, Education Training and Development, CASA House
  • Sangwon Lee, PVAW Project Officer, Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health
  • Deborah Robins, Foundation Teacher, Brunswick North West Primary School
  • Genevieve Sheppard, Senior Education Advisor, Our Watch

Moderated by Maria Delaney, PVAW Specialist, Capability Building, DVRCV

This video is part one of two. View the second part: Responding to Disclosures in Prevention Settings (2 of 2)

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Resource type: Video
Duration: 30:35

Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Engaging with parents and the wider school community (2 of 2)

Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Engaging with parents and the wider school community (2 of 2)

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This video explores ways that schools and community organisations can engage with parents and the wider community to take an active role in embedding respectful relationships within their school. This video is part of a series on Respectful Relationships in Victoria.
This video is part two of two.
View the first part: Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Engaging with parents and the wider school community (1 of 2)

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Resource type: Video
Duration: 1:10:57

Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Engaging with parents and the wider school community (1 of 2)

Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Engaging with parents and the wider school community (1 of 2)

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This video explores ways that schools and community organisations can engage with parents and the wider community to take an active role in embedding respectful relationships within their school. This video is part of a series on Respectful Relationships in Victoria.
This video is part one of two. View the second part: Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Engaging with parents and the wider school community (2 of 2)

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Resource type: Video
Duration: 21:08

Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Embedding student voice

Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Embedding student voice

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This video explores ways that schools and community organisations can engage and empower children and young people to take an active role in embedding respectful relationships within their school. This video is part of a series on Respectful Relationships in Victoria.

A panel of experts and practitioners discuss the importance of student voices in this work. This video explores practical examples from both a student, teacher and practitioner perspective.

Featuring:

  • Jarrod Bateup – Project Lead, Respectful Relationships, Western Melbourne Area, Department of Education and Training
  • Nina Laitala – Executive Officer, Victorian Student Representative Council
  • Michelle Ko – Student Executive, Victorian Student Representative Council
  • Rachel Messer – Senior Health Promotion Officer, Inspiro
  • Briony O’Keeffe – Teacher, Fitzroy High School
  • Eve Flanagan – Fitzroy High School Feminist Collective member

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Resource type: Video
Duration: 1:55:37

Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Unpacking Resistance

Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Unpacking Resistance

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This video explores the resistance that may be encountered when implementing respectful relationships education. This video is part of a series on Respectful Relationships in Victoria.

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Resource type: Video
Duration: 1:56:08

Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Setting the Scene

Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Setting the Scene

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This video is part of a series on Respectful Relationships in Victoria.

The Partners in Prevention 2017-18 seminar series was launched on Thursday 26 October 2017.

This event featured a panel of experts and practitioners discussing the current respectful relationships landscape in Victoria and the significant work and policy momentum that has brought us to this point. Guest speakers included: Emily Maguire, CEO, Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria (Moderator) Dr Marion Frere, CEO, Office of Prevention and Women’s Equality Justin McDonnell, Director Engagement, Inclusion and Support, Department of Education and Training Dr Pamela Bjork-Billings, Senior Education Advisor, Our Watch Jess Boccia, Respectful Relationships Practitioner and Consultant Professor Helen Cahill, Director Youth Research Centre, Melbourne Graduate School of Education

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Resource type: Video
Duration: 58.14

Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Early Childhood

Respectful Relationships in Victoria: Early Childhood

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This video, live streamed on April 19, 2018, discusses Respectful Relationships in early childhood. This video is part of a series on Respectful Relationships in Victoria.

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Resource type: Video
Duration: 1:45:32

PiP Seminar: Supporting bystander action to prevent violence against women

PiP Seminar: Supporting bystander action to prevent violence against women

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In the context of preventing violence against women, bystander action refers to the action taken by a bystander to challenge behaviour, attitudes, norms, policies and structures that contribute to and perpetuate violence against women.
Join the conversation with a panel of experts and practitioners who will give an overview of bystander action in the context of primary prevention, and discuss how to plan and deliver bystander approaches that align with best practice design principles. You will be sure to walk away with a pocket full of practical considerations, tools and techniques that will support you in your bystander work. Featuring: Casey Burchell, Marketing and Communications Advisor, Our Watch Tracey Egan, Gender Equity Officer, City of Monash Natalie Russell, Principal Program Officer – Mental Wellbeing, VicHealth Claire Marshall, Principal Advisor – Independent Review, Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission.
More information: https://www.partnersinprevention.org.au/resources/seminar-series/

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Resource type: Video
Duration: 1:46:22

PiP Webinar – Prevention of Violence Against Women and Family Violence in Faith Settings

PiP Webinar - Prevention of Violence Against Women and Family Violence in Faith Settings

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Recorded on 12 May 2020, this webinar was conducted for all people working to prevent violence against women and family violence. Faith communities and settings are an important environment where social beliefs and norms are shaped. These beliefs and norms have the potential to either promote violence or protect against it.

With 60% of Victorians identifying as religious (2016 Census), it’s important to understand how to reach and engage with faith communities to help prevent violence against women and family violence.

The learnings from this webinar include:

  • An inside look at Faith Communities Supporting Healthy Family Relationships – the multi-faith project examining the drivers and contributors to violence against women in faith settings.
  • An understanding of the key principles to consider when working in faith settings.
  • Strategies on how to engage with faith leaders and build their capacity to prevent violence against women.

Approaches and best practice principles to address the drivers of violence against women within a faith setting.

The resources referenced in this webinar include:

  1. Vaughan, C., Sullivan, C., Chen, J., Vaid Sandhu, M. (2020). What works to address violence against women and family violence within faith settings: An evidence guide, Parkville: University of Melbourne.
  2. Vaughan, C., Sullivan, C. (2019). Technical paper: Faith communities supporting healthy family relationships,Parkville: University of Melbourne.
  3. Tip Sheet: Faith Communities Addressing Violence Against Women and Family Violence – What Works, University of Melbourne and Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health
  4. How to talk to your church about violence against women: A communications Guide for Leaders. Anglican Diocese of Melbourne
  5. Transforming Masculinities: A training manual for Gender Champions. Tearfund, 2017
  6. SASA! Faith: A guide for faith communities to prevent violence against women and HIV. Raising Voices, 2016

Presenters

Dr Cathy Vaughan, Melbourne University

Cathy currently leads research on the role of settlement and multicultural services in responding to violence against women; the Australian arm of a multi-country study on sexual and gender-based violence against refugees; and research on building the capacity of faith leaders to prevent violence against women. She also co-leads the kNOwVAWdata course to strengthen capacity to measure violence against women in Asia and the Pacific, conducted by the University in partnership with UNFPA. She is Director of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Women’s Health hosted by the Gender and Women’s Health Unit at the University of Melbourne.

Robyn Andréo-Boosey, Anglican Diocese

Robyn manages the Anglican Diocese of Melbourne’s Preventing Violence Against Women Program and is co-founder and co-director of IC Change, a volunteer-led campaign urging the UK Government to ratify the Istanbul Convention on violence against women. Her background is in international development, gender equality, tackling violence against women, and human rights. She has worked on preventing violence against women in policy and operational roles with a range of organisations, including the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, Rape Crisis England and Wales, and the international Christian alliance to end violence against women, Restored. Robyn is particularly passionate about equipping the Church to play its part in tackling violence against women.

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Resource type: Video
Duration: 1:12:27

PiP Webinar – Supporting a whole school approach to respectful relationships education

PiP Webinar - Supporting a whole school approach to respectful relationships education

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Recorded on Tuesday 23 June 2020, this webinar unpacked and explored:

  • What a whole school approach is and why it is important.
  • What the successful implementation of a whole of school approach to respectful relationships looks like in practice.
  • The tools and resources available to support this work.
  • The barriers stopping schools from implementing a whole school approach and strategies to overcome these.
  • Lessons learnt from rolling out the whole school approach to respectful relationships and how these can be applied by others taking a whole of setting approach in different settings.

Panelists

Emma Hardley

Prevention of Violence Against Women Capability Building Specialist
Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria

Emma works across all elements of DVRCV’s PVAW delivery, focusing particularly on respectful relationships education through coordination of Partners in Prevention (PiP). Emma’s background is in education in both mainstream and specialist schools. She has worked at CASA House and as a freelance consultant in the prevention of violence against women (PVAW) sector. Emma is an experienced trainer and facilitator, previously delivering family violence response training, and a range of workshops focused on PVAW.

Jarrod Bateup

Respectful Relationships Western Melbourne
Department of Education and Training

Jarrod has been working with the Department of Education for over 12 years. Jarrod worked as both a primary and secondary school teacher for nine years and was involved in the original Respectful Relationships Education (RREiS) Pilot in 2015. Currently, he works as Project Lead Respectful Relationships with the Department of Education and Training.

Jarrod is passionate about building teacher capacity in the area of social and emotional learning because he sees the opportunity it gives students to learn vital life skills and be educated in the important topics of respect, gender equity, sexuality, self-awareness and resilience.

Sarah Tayton

Senior Policy Advisor Education
Our Watch

Sarah works at Our Watch convening the national Respectful Relationships expert group where she encourages evidence-based respectful relationships education. She also works on the Respect and Equality in Universities project.

Sarah previously worked in at the Department of Education in the Family Violence Reform team implementing the Royal Commission recommendations. Her background and experience in public health have provided her with expertise on how to apply a public health approach within a school setting.

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Resource type: Video
Duration: 1:16:44

PiP Webinar – LGBTIQ inclusive prevention in conversation with Rainbow Health Victoria

PiP Webinar - LGBTIQ inclusive prevention in conversation with Rainbow Health Victoria

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Recorded on May 27 2020, this webinar was conducted for all people working to prevent violence against women and family violence. LGBTIQ communities experience family and intimate partner violence at rates equal to or higher than non-LGBTIQ people. In conversation with Jackson Fairchild of Rainbow Health Victoria, this webinar explores the complexities that drive this violence.

Jackson discusses Rainbow Health Victoria’s latest research findings on the drivers of family and intimate partner violence for LGBTIQ communities, and ways to challenge them. Within this webinar, Jackson and Belinda O’Connor of Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria unpacked questions such as:

  • What are the myths about family and intimate partner violence as experienced by LGBTIQ people?
  • What drives family and intimate partner violence in LGBTIQ communities? And what does it have in common with violence against women?
  • What does LGBTIQ inclusive prevention messaging look like?
  • What actions can prevention of violence against women organisations and practitioners take to support LGBTIQ community organisations?

The resources referenced in this webinar include:

Presenter: Jackson Fairchild

Senior Policy and Strategy Advisor, Rainbow Health Victoria
Jackson has over ten years’ experience working as a clinician, educator, supervisor and service leader in family violence, suicide prevention, trauma recovery and LGBTIQ health. A qualified counsellor and clinical supervisor with a lived experience of family violence, Jackson’s recent roles include Director of Practice and Learning at No to Violence and Manager of Counselling, AOD and Family Violence services at Thorne Harbour Health.

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Resource type: Video
Duration: 1:20:24

PiP Seminar – Learning from change: Embedding effective evaluation into prevention practice

PiP Seminar - Learning from change: Embedding effective evaluation into prevention practice

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Held on 11 February 2020, this seminar provides an insight into the challenges that primary practitioners face in evaluating and monitoring their projects. A curated panel of evaluation experts and prevention practitioners explore some of the most pressing questions that practitioners ask about the evaluation process:

  • Why is robust evaluation important to PVAW projects? And how does it support practitioners’ learning and amplify project impact?
  • How do practitioners move beyond a simple ‘box ticking’ approach and fully embrace project evaluation to facilitate learning and initiate transformative change?How do practitioners balance the need for robust evaluation with limited funding, time and capacity?
  • How do practitioners ensure their evaluation approach is feminist and intersectional?
Speakers: Loksee Leung – Research and Evaluation Lead, the Equality Institute Monique Bouma – PVAW Coordinator, Women’s Health in the North Kathryn Aedy – PVAW Team Leader, Multicultural Centre from Women’s Health
Partners in Prevention (PiP) is a network of professionals working in Victoria to support prevention of violence against women. The project is resourced by the Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria and funded by the Victorian Government.

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Resource type: Video
Duration: 1:58.14

PiP Seminar – What about men? Engaging men and boys to prevent violence against women

PiP Seminar - What about men? Engaging men and boys to prevent violence against women

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Filmed in Melbourne on 12 March 2020, this seminar explored how to effectively frame our work to engage men and boys to prevent violence against women. A panel of experts, academics, on-the-ground prevention practitioners discussed how to manage and work through the barriers and challenges that restrict engagement with men and boys.
Filmed in Melbourne on 12 March 2020, this seminar explored how to effectively frame our work to engage men and boys to prevent violence against women. A panel of experts, academics, on-the-ground prevention practitioners discussed how to manage and work through the barriers and challenges that restrict engagement with men and boys.
Partners in Prevention (PiP) is a network of professionals working in Victoria to support prevention of violence against women. The project is resourced by the Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria and funded by the Victorian Government. More:

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Resource type: Video
Duration: 2:00.39

Know Your A-Z Poster

Know Your
A-Z Poster

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We all have a role to play in stopping violence against women.

The Know your A-Z resources offer 26 ways everybody can help challenge harmful stereotypes, promote respect and prevent violence.

You can download the free Know your A-Z poster and cards then print or share them online.

Here are some ideas on how you can use the A-Z resources.

  • In your workplace, school or club
  • Put it up in your tea room, on the fridge, on the staff notice board, on the back of toilet doors, or office partition
  • Share it with your colleagues in the newsletter or in internal communications (download newsletter blurb and image). Encourage staff to take action, do research or submit ideas around the different actions
  • Create an internal or external campaign
  • Pick a month and make it Prevention of Violence Against Women month
  • Send out one A-Z image per day/week via email, newsletter, Twitter or intranet
  • Use these prompts to start a conversation at lunch or add them to meeting agendas
  • Discuss what your organisation is doing to prevent violence against women
  • Let clients, contacts and suppliers know what you are doing to take action and invite them to join you.

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Resource type: Poster
Download file type: PDF

‘Does technology do more good than harm?’ – Public Panel (MAEVe)

'Does technology do more good than harm?' - Public Panel (MAEVe)

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The potential of new and emerging technologies in the area of violence against women is increasingly becoming recognised by governments, researchers, and community organisations alike. This public panel discussed technology’s potential as a tool to help women seek safety, challenge and change gender attitudes, as well as its potential for harm.

Date & Location:

10 February, 5.00pm to 6.30pm | Carrillo Gantner Theatre, Sidney Myer Asia Centre, The University of Melbourne

Panelists:

Clementine Ford, writer, broadcaster and public speaker

Nancy Glass, Professor, Johns Hopkins University

Cathy Humphreys, Professor, The University of Melbourne

Emily Maguire, CEO, Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria

Mark Oliver, General Manager, Tigerspike

Anastasia Powell, Senior Research Fellow, RMIT University

Facilitated by:

Kelsey Hegarty, Professor, The University of Melbourne

Organised by:

The Melbourne research Alliance to End Violence against women and their children (MAEVe) – an interdisciplinary research alliance that draws together research and evaluation capacity from across the University, in partnership with community, industry and government agencies. Their aims are to reduce harm and improve the safety and wellbeing of women, families and communities; increase accountability and improve responses to men; and prevent violence before it starts.

Video by:

The Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria (DVRCV)

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Resource type: Video
Duration: 48.21

How can your organisation support you to manage resistance? | Unpacking Resistance Episode 6

How can your organisation support you to manage resistance? | Unpacking Resistance Episode 6

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If you work in respectful relationships education or prevention of violence against women, it’s likely you’ve come across people who disagree with or challenge your work.

The ‘Unpacking Resistance’ video series delves into the experience of resistance from the perspective of practitioners working in the sector. Organisations play a crucial role in supporting their staff to do violence prevention work.

In episode 6, we explore how your organisation can support you to manage resistance. 

You can view the full series on our YouTube channel.

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Resource type: Video

How do you respond to resistance? | Unpacking Resistance Episode 5

How do you respond to resistance? | Unpacking Resistance Episode 5

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If you work in respectful relationships education or prevention of violence against women, it’s likely you’ve come across people who disagree with or challenge your work.

The ‘Unpacking Resistance’ video series delves into the experience of resistance from the perspective of practitioners working in the sector. Connecting with other practitioners in the sector to share strategies for responding to resistance can help strengthen our approaches to violence prevention.

In episode 5, we explore strategies for working with resistance. We will be releasing new episodes on YouTube each week.

For future episodes, subscribe to our channel or sign up to Partners in Prevention (PiP) at www.partnersinprevention.org.au

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Resource type: Video

How does resistance affect you? | Unpacking Resistance Episode 4

How does resistance affect you? | Unpacking Resistance Episode 4

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If you work in respectful relationships education or prevention of violence against women, it’s likely you’ve come across people who disagree with or challenge your work.

The ‘Unpacking Resistance’ video series delves into the experience of resistance from the perspective of practitioners working in the sector. In episode 4, we explore the emotional impacts of encountering resistance. We will be releasing new episodes on YouTube each week. For future episodes, subscribe to our channel or sign up to Partners in Prevention (PiP) at www.partnersinprevention.org.au

 You can view the full series on our YouTube channel.

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Resource type: Video

What is resistance? | Unpacking Resistance Episode 1

What is resistance? Unpacking Resistance ep 1.

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If you work in respectful relationships education or prevention of violence against women, it’s likely you’ve come across people who disagree with or challenge your work.

The ‘Unpacking Resistance’ video series delves into the experience of resistance from the perspective of practitioners working in the sector.

In episode 1 we explore the question – What is Resistance? We will be releasing new episodes on YouTube each week.

For future episodes, subscribe to our channel or sign up to Partners in Prevention (PiP) at www.partnersinprevention.org.au

Video production: I’m Content www.imcontent.com.au

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Resource type: Video

Primary prevention, early intervention and response

Primary prevention, early intervention and response

Approaches to addressing violence against women
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Work to address violence against women fits into three broad approaches or categories that exist along a continuum: primary prevention, secondary prevention (early intervention) and tertiary prevention (response).

Each of these approaches are important and reinforce each other. Work must occur across this continuum if we are going to create a world where women and their children live free from violence.

Using plain language and specific examples, this resource is designed to assist people to understand the three approaches to addressing violence against women and how they can situate their work across this continuum.

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Resource type: Flyer
Download file type: PDF
Best print size: A4

What is resistance?

What is resistance?

Episode 1 of the Unpacking Resistance video series

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Practitioners discuss their experiences of resistance and how it impacts their work.

Background

If you work in respectful relationships education or prevention of violence against women, it’s likely you’ve come across people who disagree with or challenge your work.

The ‘Unpacking Resistance’ video series delves into the experience of resistance from the perspective of practitioners working in the sector.

In episode 1 we explore the question – What is Resistance?

Topic

Type

Resource details

Resource type: Video
Duration: 2 minutes

More information

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ACBDEquality poster

ACBDEquality poster

Students act to prevent violence against women

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This resource offers a different prevention action for every letter of the alphabet that is relevant and relatable for young people.

Australian data shows that the majority of young Australians think violence and sexual harassment is unacceptable. However there are low levels of knowledge among young people about how to prevent violence against women.

Drawing on the wisdom, passion and ideas of an inspirational group of students, this resource has been developed to support young people to be active bystanders and promote equality and respect among their peers.

This resource is an adaption of the original Know your A-Z poster and offers a different prevention action for every letter of the alphabet that is relevant and relatable for young people.

Download the poster or individual A-Z cards to share the prevention message with your friends, family, colleagues and networks.

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Type

Resource details

Resource type: Poster
Best print size: A3

More information

You can also order ABCDEquality stickers from our store.

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Change the Story

Change the Story

What is the evidence?

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Drawing on Australia’s National evidence-based framework for preventing violence against women, ‘Change the Story’, Director of Policy and Evaluation at Our Watch Dr Lara Fergus outlined the drivers of violence against women and discussed how we can address them.

Early childhood educators are in a unique position to support the children and families they work with, as well as their colleagues experiencing violence. There is a significant opportunity to work with children to develop a foundation of gender equity and respectful relationships to help prevent violence in the next generation.

This conference aimed to build the capacity of early childhood educators to respond to and prevent violence against women. It sought to provide an understanding of:

  • The prevalence, dynamics and impact of family violence to guide the work of educators
  • How to identify and respond to family violence in early childhood centres
  • What the research says the drivers of violence against women are, how these drivers present in early childhood and opportunities to address these drivers in early childhood settings
  • How can the workplace be used as a setting to prevent and respond to violence against women

The Conference was held at the Darebin Arts and Entertainment Centre in Preston on Wednesday 13 July 2016.

Topic

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Resource details

Resource type: Video
Duration: 24:18

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ABCDEquality cards

ABCDEquality cards

Students act to prevent violence against women

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This resource offers a different prevention action for every letter of the alphabet that is relevant and relatable for young people.

Australian data shows that the majority of young Australians think violence and sexual harassment is unacceptable. However there are low levels of knowledge among young people about how to prevent violence against women.

Drawing on the wisdom, passion and ideas of an inspirational group of students, this resource has been developed to support young people to be active bystanders and promote equality and respect among their peers.

This resource offers a different prevention action for every letter of the alphabet that is relevant and relatable for young people.

Topic

Type

Resource details

Resource type: Cards
Download file type: PDF (whole set) and PNG (individual cards)
Size: 1200×1200 pixels (10cm x 10cm printed)

More information

You can also purchase these as sticker sheets.

Order online

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A Whole School Approach to Respectful Relationships Education in Schools

A Whole School Approach to Respectful Relationships Education in Schools

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This tool aids schools in implementing respectful relationships education (RRE).

Respectful relationships education is a comprehensive approach to the primary prevention of gender-based violence in schools. Schools are both education institutions and workplaces that can generate universal change to address the drivers of violence against women.

A whole school approach is about embedding systemic change across the entire school through policy, practice, procedures, staffing, environment, leadership and culture, and within the classroom.

Many schools do not have the time and resources to develop an effective whole school approach without support. Local and community organisations – including family violence and sexual assault services, local government and community and women’s health services – already have expertise in preventing violence against women in schools and responding to disclosures from both victims and perpetrators. These organisations are well placed to partner with schools to support them to plan, develop, implement and evaluate a whole school approach to Respectful Relationships Education, tailored to the needs of the school and their local community.

Topic

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Resource details

Resource type: Poster
Download file type: PDF
Best print size: A4 (double-sided)